Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2016, Page: 26-36
Effect of National Health Insurance Holding on the Choice of Health Facility for Childbirth in Ghana
Salifu Mubarik, Institute of Distance Education, University of Cape Coast, Tamale Center, Ghana
Seidu Al-hassan, Institute for Continuing Education and Interdisciplinary Research, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
Nkechi S. Owoo, Department of Economics, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
Boakye-Yiadom Louis, Department of Economics, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
Received: Jan. 2, 2016;       Accepted: Jan. 13, 2016;       Published: Jan. 29, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.20160401.14      View  2968      Downloads  68
Abstract
Maternal and child mortalities are among major health problems facing developing countries such as Ghana. Most of these deaths can be avoided by utilization of maternity health care services. The study examines the effect of health insurance holding and other socioeconomic and demographic factors on the choice of health facility for childbirth in Ghana. The study used data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health survey. Data were analyzed for descriptive statistics as well as a Multinomial Logistic Regression for identification of factors that influence delivery in health facility. The study results have shown that, holding of health insurance and wealth significantly influences expectant mother’s decision to use government health facilities for childbirth. Also, the study revealed considerable variations in region and between rural and urban utilization of this services in Ghana. It is recommended that in order to improve the utilization of health facility for childbirth services and hence maternal health care utilization, there is the need to improve public awareness and efforts should also be taking by policy makers to integrate the private sector properly into the National Health Insurance scheme. Policy should also target mothers who have had the experience of child birth on the need to use health care facility services for each pregnancy. The government and other service providers (NGOs, religious institutions and private providers) may endeavor to improve on the distribution of health facilities, human resources, good roads and necessary infrastructure among other things in order to facilitate easy access to health care providers especially for rural dwellers.
Keywords
Maternal Mortality, National Health Insurance, Ghana, Childbirth and Health Facility
To cite this article
Salifu Mubarik, Seidu Al-hassan, Nkechi S. Owoo, Boakye-Yiadom Louis, Effect of National Health Insurance Holding on the Choice of Health Facility for Childbirth in Ghana, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2016, pp. 26-36. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20160401.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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