Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2016, Page: 20-25
Present Scenario of Insecticides and Fungicides Use in Largest Mango Cultivation Area in Bangladesh
Asad Ud-Daula, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Salim Raza, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Golam Mukit, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Soumen Das, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
A. T. M. Mijanur Rahman, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Abul Kashem Tang, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Received: Dec. 13, 2015;       Accepted: Jan. 8, 2016;       Published: Jan. 27, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.20160401.13      View  5092      Downloads  88
Abstract
This study has been conducted to assess the present scenario of spraying insecticides/fungicides during the whole cultivation period of mango in Shibgonj upazilla of Chapainawabgonj district. A total number of 250 mango growers were randomly selected and interviewed by structured questionnaires from December, 2014 to June, 2015. The data were collected with respect to their educational level, cultivating land, times and types of insecticides/fungicides spray, and farmer’s consciousness about the excessive use of insecticides/fungicides. Out of the 250 mango growers, 184 were illiterate which accounts almost 74% followed by under HSC, 51 (20%) and higher educated, 15 (6%). Around 1-3 acre of land was used by 145 (58%) mango growers for cultivation followed by 3-7 acre by 85 (34%) and more than 7 acres by 20 (8%). Eight insecticides and seven fungicides under different trade names were most commonly sprayed at 2, 3, 4, and even more than 7 times in the stage of mango flowering, green mango, and finally, in mature stages. Most importantly, 151 (60%) growers do not have any, while 99 (40%) have very little knowledge about the negative effects of using excessive amounts of insecticides/fungicides. The mango growers are randomly using same pesticides under different brand name. Additionally, they frequently use fungicides instead of insecticides that cause no death of mango pest. As a result, they could not protect early dropping of mangoes. Furthermore, 103 (41%) and 147 (59%) growers have little and no knowledge regarding the side effects of spraying of formalin and calcium carbide that are used for preservation and early ripening of mango, respectively. Therefore, necessary actions should be taken immediately keeping in mind not only to reduce the early fall out of mangoes but also to produce safe mangoes for consumption.
Keywords
Mango Cultivation, Mango Growers, Insecticides and Fungicides
To cite this article
Asad Ud-Daula, Salim Raza, Golam Mukit, Soumen Das, A. T. M. Mijanur Rahman, Abul Kashem Tang, Present Scenario of Insecticides and Fungicides Use in Largest Mango Cultivation Area in Bangladesh, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2016, pp. 20-25. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20160401.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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